UCLA identifies genetic link to PTSD

PRESS RELEASE  LOS ANGELES- Why do some people experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) while others who suffered the same ordeal do not? A new UCLA study may shed light on the answer.

UCLA scientists have linked two genes involved in serotonin production to a higher risk of developing PTSD. Published in the April 3 online edition of the Journal of Affective Disorders, the findings suggest that susceptibility to PTSD is inherited, pointing to new ways of screening for and treating the disorder.   

“People can develop post-traumatic stress disorder after surviving a life-threatening ordeal like war, rape or a natural disaster,” said lead author Dr. Armen Goenjian, a research professor of psychiatry at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA. “If confirmed, our findings could eventually lead to new ways to screen people at risk for PTSD and target specific medicines for preventing and treating the disorder.” 

Read the rest of the press release here:  UCLA Study Identifies genes linked to PTSD

From the Count Your Culture Blog